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2 edition of Senior executives" role in the computer-based information systems (CBIS) implementation process found in the catalog.

Senior executives" role in the computer-based information systems (CBIS) implementation process

Mokhtar Mohd-Yusof

Senior executives" role in the computer-based information systems (CBIS) implementation process

the case of Malaysian Government agencies.

by Mokhtar Mohd-Yusof

  • 332 Want to read
  • 4 Currently reading

Published by University of Salford in Salford .
Written in English


Edition Notes

PhD thesis, Information Systems Research Centre.

ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18952219M

Computers and programs are the hammer, nails, and lumber of computer-based information systems, but alone they cannot produce the information a particular organization needs. To understand information systems, you must understand the problems they are designed to solve, their architectural and design elements, and the organizational processes.   Executive information systems (EIS) – is a type of management information system intended to facilitate and support the information and decision-making needs of senior executives by providing easy access to both internal and external information relevant to meeting the strategic goals of the organization.

Today, many organizations can function and compete effectively without computer-based information systems. (A) True (B) False Answer: (B) For someone to be a good CIO, technical ability is the most important characteristic. (A) True (B) False Answer: (B) One of the primary roles of a senior IS manager is to communicate with other. Paul C. Tang and W. Ed Hammond. Much has changed since the release of the first edition of The Computer-Based Patient Record: An Essential Technology for Health current environment in which health care is practiced and the information technology available to its practitioners are significantly different from that which existed when the study was completed in

computer-based information systems. The precise number of interviews varied from company to company. The managers interviewed were drawn from different levels and functions within the companies. The interviews explored the views, experiences and concerns of the managers in relation to the use of information systems and their roles and. ing tasks, was introduced to senior executives at the beginning of the ’80s. An EIS is a computer-based information system designed to provide senior executives and, in many cases, middle- and lower-level managers access to information relevant to their management activities (Leidner et al., ). It.


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Senior executives" role in the computer-based information systems (CBIS) implementation process by Mokhtar Mohd-Yusof Download PDF EPUB FB2

Basically executive information systems were developed as mainframe computer-based programs. The purpose was computer applications that would highlight information to satisfy senior executives’ needs. Typically, an EIS telecommunications will play a pivotal role in networked information systems.

Transmitting data from. Executive information systems (EIS) are now successfully providing computer support for senior executives in a growing number of organizations. An Executive information system (EIS), also known as an Executive support system (ESS), is a type of management support system that facilitates and supports senior executive information and decision-making needs.

It provides easy access to internal and external information relevant to organizational goals. It is commonly considered a specialized form of decision support system (DSS). Critical success factors revisited: Success and failure cases of information systems for senior executives Article in Decision Support Systems 30(4) March with Reads.

senior leaders to create the vision of the future. Then they must create the mechanisms and commit the resources to achieve that future. This hand-book will help them go beyond planning and use their strategic plans to change the way they do business.

The principal research for Strategic Management for Senior Leaders: AFile Size: KB. Executive Information System: An executive information system (EIS) is a decision support system (DSS) used to assist senior executives in the decision-making process.

It does this by providing easy access to important data needed to achieve strategic goals in an organization. An EIS normally features graphical displays on an easy-to-use. With the increasing use of computer-based information systems, an ocean of data has been collected, stored, and made available for a wide array of analyses.

These analyses may be general or specific, potentially very intricate, and may expose information or nonobvious relationships and connections, leading to breaches of privacy and trust.

DOROTHY E. LEIDNER AND JOYCE J. ELAM The Impact of Executive Information Systems and McLeod ). The computer-based information sources remain the least studied in the context of executive decision making because executives have tended to use other managers and their own intuition as their primary information sources (Jones and McLeod ).

Information systems (IS) are formal, sociotechnical, organizational systems designed to collect, process, store, and distribute information.

In a sociotechnical perspective, information systems are composed by four components: task, people, structure (or roles), and technology. A computer information system is a system composed of people and computers that processes or interprets information.

informations systems field and the management of corporations in the 80's. Six major conclusions have arisen from the study thus far.

These conclusions are: I. There is a small, but rapidly growing, number of senior line managers who desire today to make use of computer-based information retrieval and analysis.

The underlying objective, in. An executive information system (ETS) is a computer-based information system designed to provide senior managers access to information relevant to their management activities. With such trends as globalization and intense competition increasing the importance of fast and accurate decision making, the use of these systems by executives may.

A sophisticated, highly targeted phishing campaign has hit high-level executives at more than businesses, stealing confidential documents and contact lists. Feedback: It is the component of an information system which defines that an IS may be provided with feedback.

Types of Information system. The information systems can be categorized into four types. These are: 1. Executive Information Systems. It is a strategic-level information system which is found at the top of the Pyramid. A Management Information System is a computer –based system that derives data from all an organization’s departments and produces routine reports of the organization’s performance.

Management Information System is designed to help Middle Management make its decisions. 3, Decision Support System(DSS): Is a tool (computer program) of process,whose utility is related to its ability to. Executive information systems, which track both internal and external information, enable senior managers to monitor and control large, geographically dispersed and complex organizations.

Six Major Types of Information Systems A typical organization has six of information systems with each supporting a specific organizational level.

These systems include transaction processing systems (TPS) at the operational level, office automation systems (OAS) and knowledge work systems (KWS) at the knowledge level, management information systems (MIS) and decision support Systems (DSS) at. Executive Information System is commonly abbreviated as EIS, and it is a management information system which supports, facilitates, and makes decisions for senior executives by providing easy access to both internal and external ive Information System can also be considered a specialized form of a Decision Support System.

An Executive Information System (EIS) is a tool that provides direct on-line access to relevant information in a useful and navigable format. Relevant information is timely, accurate, and actionable information about aspects of a business that are of particular interest to the senior manager.

Maeve Cummings, Co-author of Management Information Systems for the Information Age and Professor of Accounting & Computer Information Systems at Pittsburg State University in Pittsburg, Kansas, explains how MIS functions in academia. “[Management information systems is] the study of computers and computing in a business environment.

base it was felt, a role model for the I/S executive would emerge. Method Any definition of the objectives, critical success factors, and operating methods of a "model" information systems manager must be, by definition, subjective.

Our research was, therefore, case-based and inductive. Inter-views were conducted with the head of information. An executive information system has traditionally been defined as `a computer-based information delivery and communication system designed to support the needs of top executives'.' This definition, however, tells only half the story.

96 Long Range Planning Vol. 25 Most executives, especially in the U.K., are perfectly happy with their human Cited by: Chapter 1 Supporting Business Decision-Making Good information is essential for fact-based decision-making.

Introduction Beginning in the late s, many vendors, practitioners and academics promoted computer-based Decision Support Systems (DSS). They created high expectations forFile Size: KB.In Rockart was awarded the Nonfiction Computer Press Association Book of the Year Award; and inthe Leo Award by the Association for Information Systems.

Rockart's research interests focused on the "managers’ usage of computer-based information with a special concentration on the need to design information flow for effective.